What to Expect During a Field Sobriety Test

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To enforce DUI laws, sometimes a driver may have to take the sobriety test. Usually, this may come before you take the breathalyzer test. It is advisable to avoid alcohol if you are driving. But some drivers drink and drive endangering their lives and those of others. That is why the security officers enforce this law. In case you are a victim of circumstances, you should know what to expect before you take these test.

Here is what to expect during a Field Sobriety Test:

  1. Horizontal gaze nystagmus HGN
  2. One-leg stand
  3. Walk and turn

Horizontal gaze nystagmus HGN

Naturally, when the eye gazes at any side, it should involuntarily jerk. But under the influence of alcohol, this jerking will be more intense. This way, the police officer will know that you are under the influence of alcohol. Another indicator is the failure to follow a moving object. Intense jerking when the eye turns forty-five degrees, or there is more deviation indicates that the person is under alcohol influence.

Walk and turn

The police officer may request you to walk for at least nine steps and turn when standing on one foot. The main aim is to test your ability to focus on a task without paying attention to any other thing or surroundings. Most people when under the influence of alcohol, cannot perform this task.

One-leg stand

The police officer may request you to stand on one leg. If you cannot do that without swaying your hands, hopping, or if you can’t maintain the posture without putting the other leg down, then they will know that you are under the influence of alcohol, or other substances.

There may be deviations from the field sobriety tests once in a while. Sometimes, tipping your head backward while standing may also determine if you are sober. They may also ask you to count the numbers backward, recite the alphabet, or ask you to count the fingers they raise at intervals.

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